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19

Jan

Day 12: Sitting on Top of the Seoul

The days since my home stay have been pretty bland, which explains the recent lack of posts. But some things of interest have come up recently that I thought I’d enlighten you guys on. 

Just came back from some 7 storey flea market filled with clothes. I went because I thought I’d be going somewhere that was interesting. I hate clothes and I hate shopping for clothes, especially with ladies. Lord knows I love ‘em but I can’t stand going shopping with them. So it should be evident that going to a 7 storey clothes factory with six other girls wasn’t on my “Things to do in Korea” list. However, Amanda and I were able to salvage the trip by sitting in an empty food court sharing a kiwi milkshake. Fun note: Amanda and I wore the exact same thing (black cardigan, white v-neck, and blue jeans) without planning to do so. I know what you’re asking and yes, you can be as cool as us if you just try really hard.

But onto the story at hand. The whole lot of us went to the Seoul N Tower, which is Seoul’s version of the CN Tower. Sitting atop the Namsam mountain and at about 500m above sea level, the tower allowed us to see all the entire city. The view was breathtaking. I’ve had my fingers on the keyboard for about 5 minutes now trying to think of how to explain it but I just can’t. Instead, in my next post I’ll have the pictures we took from the tower.

On the tower, there were little tiles that people would put to commemorate them being there and their love for another. Outside the tower were locks, thousands upon thousands of lock that couples would put to “lock” their love in place (pictures in the next post). It was so “cute” that one of the my classmates even placed a lock there. 

Also, there was a teddy bear museum. Well, it wasn’t really a museum as much as it was a little store that sold teddy bears. Pretty friggen lame. 

Fun Asian Facts:

  • Almost everyone lives in an apartment/condo. I still haven’t seen a single house. Also, when I told a Korean girl I lived in a house back in Toronto she was amazed. I felt pretty proud of my house then.